Bitcoin Will Die if These 4 Problems Remain Unsolved: Teen ...

All The Longreads (So Far)

I'm trying to work on a system that would pull only the longreads links out and shove them into their own RSS feed. It's super hacky and embarrassing and all the other things that prevent people from sharing code (I will eventually, I promise...it's only 11 lines of python right now). But, I should at least share all the links, by date, in a post. Please enjoy all the longreads:
Tue, 20 Nov 2018 21:56:00 -0000 * How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes * Self-driving trucks in US offer window into where machines may replace humans * When Elon Musk Tunnels Under Your Home * The Case Against Quantum Computing * HOW GOOGLE AND AMAZON GOT AWAY WITH NOT BEING REGULATED * How to Use an iPod Touch as a Secure Device Instead of a Phone * Scientists say goodbye to physical definition of the kilogram
Fri, 16 Nov 2018 22:15:10 -0000 * THE GENIUS NEUROSCIENTIST WHO MIGHT HOLD THE KEY TO TRUE AI * Are Killer Robots the Future of War? Parsing the Facts on Autonomous Weapons * The Internet Has a Huge C/C++ Problem and Developers Don't Want to Deal With It * How Superhuman Built an Engine to Find Product/Market Fit * THE HAIL MARY PLAN TO RESTART A HACKED US ELECTRIC GRID * Space Camp grows up
Fri, 09 Nov 2018 21:56:00 -0000 * Why Technology Favors Tyranny * Tech C.E.O.s Are in Love With Their Principal Doomsayer * HQ Trivia was a blockbuster hit — but internal turmoil and a shrinking audience have pushed its company to the brink * ‘It’s Giant and Has Like Five Million Buttons.’ The Office Desk Phone Won’t Die * Why Doctors Hate Their Computers * Here Comes ‘Smart Dust,’ the Tiny Computers That Pull Power from the Air * ASTRONOMERS SEE MATERIAL ORBITING A BLACK HOLE RIGHT AT THE EDGE OF FOREVER
Fri, 02 Nov 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * The Facebook Dilemma, Part 1 * The Facebook Dilemma, Part 2 * A Cryptocurrency Millionaire Wants to Build a Utopia in Nevada * The Man Behind the Scooter Revolution * A Fork in the Road for Avis * The Encyclopedia of the Missing
Fri, 26 Oct 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * Inside Rockstar Games' Culture Of Crunch * At Netflix, Radical Transparency and Blunt Firings Unsettle the Ranks * Podcast on Netflix Culture * It Might Get Loud: Inside Silicon Valley’s Battle to Own Voice Tech * How Dara Khosrowshahi’s Iranian heritage shapes how he leads Uber * AN ALTERNATIVE HISTORY OF SILICON VALLEY DISRUPTION
Fri, 05 Oct 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * The iPhone XS & XS Max Review: Unveiling the Silicon Secrets * Sex Workers Pioneered the Early Internet—and It Screwed Them Over * Raised by YouTube * Old Unicorn, New Tricks: Airbnb Has A Sky-High Valuation. Here's Its Audacious Plan To Earn It * EA announces ‘FIFA 19’ PS4 esports tournament
Fri, 28 Sep 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * How Uber is getting flying cars off the ground * Coinbase Wants To Be Too Big To Fail * The Apple Watch – Tipping Point Time for Healthcare * Meet the Community Keeping Obsolete Supercomputers Alive * The first Android phone 10 years later: An annotated review * Hacker says he'll livestream deletion of Zuckerberg's Facebook page
Fri, 21 Sep 2018 20:46:00 -0000 * Inside Facebook’s Election ‘War Room’ * Bitcoin Miners Flock to New York’s Remote Corners, but Get Chilly Reception * Living The Stream * A brief history of the numeric keypad * Inside the Dramatic, Painful--and Hugely Successful--Return of Reddit's Founders
Fri, 14 Sep 2018 20:55:47 -0000 * Android 9 Pie, thoroughly reviewed * Why a Leading Venture Capitalist Is Betting on a Decentralized Internet * Olaf Carlson-Wee Rode the Bitcoin Boom to Silicon Valley Riches. Can He Survive the Crash? * Memo to the Silicon Valley boys’ club: Arlan Hamilton has no time for your BS * Driverless Hype Collides With Merciless Reality
Fri, 07 Sep 2018 21:02:25 -0000 * Inside the World of Eddy Cue, Apple’s Services Chief * Bezos Unbound: Exclusive Interview With The Amazon Founder On What He Plans To Conquer Next * The Super Rich of Silicon Valley Have a Doomsday Escape Plan * What went wrong at Social Capital * How Android Pie’s Adaptive Battery and Adaptive Brightness work * The man who won the lottery 14 times
Fri, 31 Aug 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * Franken-algorithms: the deadly consequences of unpredictable code * Logged off: meet the teens who refuse to use social media * How Big Tech Swallowed Seattle * The Mystery of People Who Speak Dozens of Languages
Fri, 17 Aug 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * VIRGIN GALACTIC’S ROCKET MAN * Inside Evernote’s brain * LET’S ALL GO BACK TO TUMBLR * Why Can’t Europe Do Tech? * To Get Ready for Robot Driving, Some Want to Reprogram Pedestrians
Fri, 03 Aug 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * How Robot Hands Are Evolving to Do What Ours Can * Why the Next Silicon Valley Will Probably Be Outside the U.S. * Masayoshi Son’s secret to running his $100 billion fund: Telling start-ups to treat each other like family * What Happened to General Magic? * Growing Up Jobs
Fri, 27 Jul 2018 20:56:00 -0000 * Brock Pierce: The Hippie King of Cryptocurrency * How Silicon Valley Has Disrupted Philanthropy * THE 'GUERRILLA' WIKIPEDIA EDITORS WHO COMBAT CONSPIRACY THEORIES * Inside Google’s Shadow Workforce * MySpace and the Coding Legacy it Left Behind
Fri, 13 Jul 2018 20:55:00 -0000 * Hell for Elon Musk Is a Midsize Sedan * How Twitter Became Home to the Teen Status Update * Why Some of Instagram's Biggest Memers Are Locking Their Accounts * GEORGE HOTZ IS ON A HACKER CRUSADE AGAINST THE ‘SCAM’ OF SELF-DRIVING CARS * THE ONLY GOOD ONLINE FANDOM LEFT IS DUNE * Netflix Isn’t Being Reckless, It’s Just Playing a Game No One Else Dares (Netflix Misunderstandings, Pt. 3)
Fri, 22 Jun 2018 20:50:39 -0000 * How Twitter Made The Tech World's Most Unlikely Comeback * The Legend of Nintendo * Intel now faces a fight for its future * INSIDE THE CRYPTO WORLD'S BIGGEST SCANDAL
Fri, 08 Jun 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * ‘I can understand about 50 percent of the things you say’: How Congress is struggling to get smart on tech * The Twitter crime mystery that gripped Spain * Meet the people who still use Myspace: 'It's given me so much joy' * Exploring The Digital Ruins Of 'Second Life' * Why Aren’t We All Buying Houses on the Internet?
Fri, 01 Jun 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * Obama's US Digital Service Survives Trump—Quietly * he Search for Women Who Want Cybersecurity Careers * How Futures Trading Changed Bitcoin Prices * The Growing Emptiness of the "Star Wars" Universe
Fri, 11 May 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * Don't Skype Me: How Microsoft Turned Consumers Against a Beloved Brand * How to Make Your Open Office Less Annoying * The 15 People Who Keep Wikipedia’s Editors From Killing Each Other * The Wealthy Are Hoarding $10 Billion of Bitcoin in Bunkers * Supercomputers are driving a revolution in hurricane forecasting
Fri, 04 May 2018 20:57:00 -0000 * ‘Hi, It’s Amazon Calling. Here’s What We Don’t Like in Your City.’ * Over 400 Startups Are Trying to Become the Next Warby Parker. Inside the Wild Race to Overthrow Every Consumer Category * All We Want to Do Is Watch Each Other Play Video Games * CoinTalk
Fri, 27 Apr 2018 20:30:29 -0000 * Inside Jeff Bezos’s DC Life * Hulu Beyond 'Handmaid's Tale': Execs and Stars on a Promising Yet Uncertain Future * Can Silicon Valley Get You Pregnant? * You could be flirting on dating apps with paid impersonators
Fri, 06 Apr 2018 21:05:17 -0000 * Lawyer bots take the hassle out of fighting parking tickets and property taxes — and could cost local governments real revenue * How Europe’s new privacy rule is reshaping the internet * Checking in with the Facebook fact-checking partnership * A 200-Year-Old Idea Offers A New Way to Trace Stolen Bitcoins * South Korean millennials are reeling from the Bitcoin bust
submitted by berrydewd to RideHome [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: GoldandBlack top posts from 2016-08-01 to 2019-06-12 11:22 PDT

Period: 1044.74 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 55684
Rate (per day) 0.96 53.28
Unique Redditors 295 6531
Combined Score 220956 394481

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 29422 points, 125 submissions: MasterTeacher123
    1. Pentagon Spent $4.6 Million on Lobster Tail and Crab in One Month (594 points, 95 comments)
    2. The Battle Isn't Right vs. Left. It’s Statism vs. Individualism (511 points, 66 comments)
    3. Kamala Harris Hopes You'll Forget Her Record as a Drug Warrior and Draconian Prosecutor (484 points, 50 comments)
    4. After the Supreme Court Said Unions Can’t Force Non-Members to Pay Dues, Almost All of Them Stopped (445 points, 123 comments)
    5. Why the Hammer and Sickle Should Be Treated Like the Swastika (423 points, 56 comments)
    6. No One Is Coming to Rescue You—Especially Not a Presidential Candidate (416 points, 28 comments)
    7. AOC's Green New Deal Is a U.S. Version of Mao’s Disastrous Great Leap Forward (412 points, 82 comments)
    8. The Green New Deal Is a Trojan Horse for Socialism (410 points, 81 comments)
    9. Minimum Wage Hikes Are Killing Jobs in California's Poorest Communities, Study Says (408 points, 125 comments)
    10. Victims of Communism Day 2019 (402 points, 96 comments)
  2. 26598 points, 114 submissions: Anen-o-me
    1. Laws for thee but not for me! Cop destroys civilian property and flips off citizen, citizen flips him back and gets mobbed by cops (936 points, 308 comments)
    2. Capitalism's Evil Quest... (827 points, 77 comments)
    3. Free Assange (714 points, 77 comments)
    4. Another brutally honest comment on the US army post (630 points, 79 comments)
    5. Amazon will donate 2% of purchases to the charity of your choice at no cost to you. I chose the Ludwig Von Mises Institute, they received $3,500 in donations this quarter! Please use Smile.Amazon.com and choose a charity! (615 points, 150 comments)
    6. Assange has reportedly been arrested by British Police after a sudden and illegal termination of his asylum. Sad proof of the dark times for all supporters of freedom in the internet age :( (571 points, 198 comments)
    7. The perfect woman doesn't exis... (504 points, 52 comments)
    8. What most Americans have been indoctrinated to think. (493 points, 23 comments)
    9. TIL that farmers in USA are hacking their John Deere tractors with Ukrainian firmware, which seems to be the only way to actually own the machines and their software, rather than rent them for lifetime from John Deere. (478 points, 114 comments)
    10. Anarchapulco: Ron Paul takes the stage... (468 points, 37 comments)
  3. 17675 points, 81 submissions: Anenome5
    1. The Most Perfect Libertarian Meme I Ever Did See... "Unchecked People" (843 points, 45 comments)
    2. Spread this far and wide! (654 points, 146 comments)
    3. Colorado sheriff is willing to go to jail rather than enforce a proposed gun-seizing law... (644 points, 52 comments)
    4. Ocasio-Cortez falls for the Sweden Socialism meme: "I’m Going to Turn America into Another Sweden, Not Venezuela" --- the Swedish are constantly bemused by this, they're more capitalistic than the US is (613 points, 143 comments)
    5. Jury awards Sen. Rand Paul $580,000 in civil suit against neighbor who attacked him (577 points, 78 comments)
    6. Supreme Court poised to limit police power to seize property --- fucking finally (456 points, 44 comments)
    7. Ancap Flag Painting (439 points, 30 comments)
    8. Former Reddit CEO Pao: "Regulation will give them an excuse to take on people and their bad behavior." --- Regulation against hate speech would give companies cover to censor political opponents in a way that they wouldn't have to take personal responsibility for. The Gov forced them, they can say. (411 points, 80 comments)
    9. Chinese driver gets ticket for scratching his face because AI software thought he was using a cellphone :| (374 points, 27 comments)
    10. With Government Shut Down, Citizens Forced To Interfere In Their Own Lives (361 points, 16 comments)
  4. 12663 points, 67 submissions: JobDestroyer
    1. After Winning a $15 Minimum Wage, Fast Food Workers Now Battle Unfair Firings (590 points, 296 comments)
    2. TIL a Japanese sushi chain CEO majorly contributed to a drop in piracy off the Somalian coast by providing the pirates with training as tuna fishermen (546 points, 27 comments)
    3. Sign from protest against proposed "Red Flag" law in New Hampshire. (442 points, 71 comments)
    4. In 3 Years, Cops Have Killed 450% More Citizens Than 4 Decades of Mass Shootings COMBINED (348 points, 107 comments)
    5. Some Uganda libertarians just started a liberty library! (336 points, 30 comments)
    6. 3D-printed guns are back, and this time they are unstoppable (330 points, 73 comments)
    7. Venezuela Raises Minimum Wage 3,000% and Lots of Workers Get Fired (322 points, 38 comments)
    8. The effects of hyperinflation in Zimbabwe. (287 points, 21 comments)
    9. End the war in Afghanistan :: Rand Paul's AFGHAN Service Act would put an end to Afghanistan. (276 points, 40 comments)
    10. My husband, Rand Paul, and our family have suffered intimidation and threats (273 points, 74 comments)
  5. 4507 points, 26 submissions: properal
    1. Record Number of Americans Call Government Our Biggest Problem (486 points, 35 comments)
    2. Venezuela Isn’t Just a Failed State. It’s a Failure of Socialism. (350 points, 84 comments)
    3. 19 in 20 Americans Don't Know World Poverty is Falling | Chelsea Follett (339 points, 64 comments)
    4. /Economics/ discovers Property Rights as a solution to Climate change. (256 points, 63 comments)
    5. Why the Left Isn't Convinced by Your Economics Arguments | Ryan McMaken (197 points, 251 comments)
    6. FBI's "Suicide Letter" to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Dangers of Unchecked Surveillance (185 points, 4 comments)
    7. Truth in Itemization (180 points, 21 comments)
    8. If Imports Were Truly Bad for an Economy, Military Blockades Would Not Exist (173 points, 60 comments)
    9. Ron Paul Receives Faithless Electoral Vote (168 points, 23 comments)
    10. First they came for... (164 points, 29 comments)
  6. 4310 points, 16 submissions: MrZer
    1. Guy gets jumped for disrespecting Stalin statue (570 points, 109 comments)
    2. Cop slaps phone out of teens hand and flips off teen. (519 points, 87 comments)
    3. Milton Friedman on Tariffs (363 points, 69 comments)
    4. Trump quietly signs largest wilderness preservation bill (354 points, 88 comments)
    5. Muslim youth group cleans up national parks amid government shutdown (Private individuals taking care of things, I thought only the State could handle this task) (307 points, 24 comments)
    6. I was optimistic about the French Protests... Until I read their demands (304 points, 175 comments)
    7. "imagine checks without taxes" Almost 100k likes on Twitter (292 points, 56 comments)
    8. PepsiCo sues 4 Indian farmers for $150,000 each for ‘infringing its rights’ by growing the potato variety used in its Lays chips (285 points, 72 comments)
    9. Yellow vests: Protesters in Paris set fire to dozens of cars in anger at millionaire Notre Dame donations - Demonstrators voice frustration at equivalent of £770m raised for cathedral while workers' demands remain unmet (277 points, 77 comments)
    10. Next Venezuela: Bolivia rolls out Universal Healthcare (240 points, 46 comments)
  7. 3703 points, 21 submissions: LibertyAboveALL
    1. Illinois may tax private retirement funds to pay public worker pensions (396 points, 103 comments)
    2. Voters in Switzerland approve stronger gun control laws by nearly two-thirds despite resistance (304 points, 155 comments)
    3. Mom Arrested For Leaving 8- and 9-Year-Olds Home Alone for Less Than an Hour (264 points, 69 comments)
    4. Bartender charged for serving man who allegedly went on to kill 8 people (259 points, 148 comments)
    5. The Insane Battle To Sabotage a New Apartment Building Explains San Francisco's Housing Crisis (193 points, 78 comments)
    6. U.S. Student Loan Debt Sets Record, Doubling Since Recession (175 points, 72 comments)
    7. Chinese teens are rejecting Communist Party propaganda and the government is freaking out (167 points, 29 comments)
    8. Julian Assange offers job to fired Google employee who wrote "anti-diversity" memo - "Censorship is for losers." (161 points, 50 comments)
    9. Ben Shapiro's view on Assange arrest is getting him roasted by many of his fans in the YT comment section. Hilarious! (159 points, 124 comments)
    10. Africans are being sold as slaves in Libya. Thanks, Hillary Clinton. (156 points, 22 comments)
  8. 2862 points, 10 submissions: vfhuuuuu
    1. "The welfare state is the oldest con game in the world. First you take people's money away quietly and then you give some of it back to them flamboyantly" - Thomas Sowell (613 points, 51 comments)
    2. Only about 21% of American millionaires have received any inheritance at all, with only 3% receiving over $1,000,000, study shows. (558 points, 99 comments)
    3. I basically just sat through 6 hours of statist propaganda (304 points, 113 comments)
    4. TIL that you're not required to wear a seat belt in New Hampshire if you're over 18 (304 points, 81 comments)
    5. Latinos are twice as likely to vote Libertarian than the general population (303 points, 130 comments)
    6. A Christmas Carol: A play about a greedy man becoming generous through social interaction, not state-sanctioned violence. (238 points, 30 comments)
    7. Last month, Washington DC raised taxes on Uber and Lyft to pay for it's shitty Metro system. To give you an idea of what this money will be used for; the city plans on spending $320 Million dollars to build ONE station. (162 points, 50 comments)
    8. In Bermuda, where Black and White people make roughly equal amounts of money, the IQ gap between races does not exist. (151 points, 193 comments)
    9. Just a quick reminder that the Republican party is just as anti-liberty as the Democrats, and "Libertarians" that support it should be ignored and downvoted. (117 points, 106 comments)
    10. Being a Gay Communist is as ironic as being a Jewish Neo-Nazi. (112 points, 65 comments)
  9. 2768 points, 7 submissions: LosFajitas
    1. When a capitalist tries to sell his product or service for the highest price they can get, they are seen as greedy. When a worker tries to sell their labor for the highest price they can get, they are seen as noble and deserving. (488 points, 138 comments)
    2. Liberals: We need to end the two party system! *Howard Schultz announces possible presidential run as an independent * Liberals: WOAAAHH THERE BUDDY SLOW DOWN! (444 points, 54 comments)
    3. I'm looking forward to the Democratic Primary because it's going to be one giant competition on who can give people the most free things. (408 points, 132 comments)
    4. It's no longer about revenue, taxes are now punitive measures. (400 points, 134 comments)
    5. "Judges Plead Guilty in Scheme to Jail Youths for Profit" oh but that can never happen in gov courts (358 points, 67 comments)
    6. Andrew Yang is one of the most arrogant people I have ever seen speak (355 points, 243 comments)
    7. Anyone else hate when people refer to a presidential candidate as "the person who will save this country" (315 points, 34 comments)
  10. 2264 points, 12 submissions: ayanamirs
    1. People Are Hiring Private Police Squads in Detroit (HBO) (375 points, 64 comments)
    2. Paul Krugman (Nobel 2008) (321 points, 52 comments)
    3. If you want #bitcoin to rise, teach Austrian Economics to people. (212 points, 167 comments)
    4. "A lot of people disagree with me, but I think people should be happy to pay taxes" < Obama to brazilians (210 points, 62 comments)
    5. Dutch national newspaper urges people to sell all their Bitcoins as it undermines the government, could destabilise the economy and reduces the power of central banks. Sounds like a reason to buy to me (192 points, 32 comments)
    6. US socialists can't deal against brazilians (167 points, 39 comments)
    7. Could someone please explain this? (161 points, 23 comments)
    8. Guns Law in Brazil is very restricted. 63880 deaths by year. (154 points, 27 comments)
    9. Look this answer (123 points, 134 comments)
    10. Congratulations To Bolivarian Socialism - Venezuela Now Has To Import Oil From The US (120 points, 18 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. JobDestroyer (7914 points, 897 comments)
  2. natermer (4011 points, 342 comments)
  3. Anen-o-me (3256 points, 535 comments)
  4. MasterTeacher123 (3201 points, 176 comments)
  5. Lemmiwinks99 (3185 points, 439 comments)
  6. E7ernal (2549 points, 472 comments)
  7. Anenome5 (2463 points, 430 comments)
  8. nosmokingbandit (2320 points, 174 comments)
  9. Perleflamme (2226 points, 634 comments)
  10. phaethon0 (2216 points, 144 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Does that sound like a work of a journalist? by deleted (1064 points, 115 comments)
  2. Laws for thee but not for me! Cop destroys civilian property and flips off citizen, citizen flips him back and gets mobbed by cops by Anen-o-me (936 points, 308 comments)
  3. The Most Perfect Libertarian Meme I Ever Did See... "Unchecked People" by Anenome5 (843 points, 45 comments)
  4. Capitalism's Evil Quest... by Anen-o-me (827 points, 77 comments)
  5. Amazing way to not pay Taxes by ArbitraryOrder (794 points, 71 comments)
  6. Free Assange by Anen-o-me (714 points, 77 comments)
  7. Man who lives in massive palace surrounded by priceless art and catered to by staff of thousands asks if people really need so many material objects by TheJucheisLoose (690 points, 75 comments)
  8. His name was Gary Webb. by TrainingWeekend (675 points, 66 comments)
  9. Presented without comment by newimprovement (658 points, 152 comments)
  10. Spread this far and wide! by Anenome5 (654 points, 146 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 284 points: BakeshopNewb's comment in Officers Had No Duty to Protect Students in Parkland Massacre, Judge Rules
  2. 272 points: locolarue's comment in I was optimistic about the French Protests... Until I read their demands
  3. 268 points: Glothr's comment in Spread this far and wide!
  4. 247 points: hairguythrowaway4171's comment in Lawmakers in Hawaii Propose Repealing Second Amendment
  5. 245 points: kurwacudownie's comment in Cop slaps phone out of teens hand and flips off teen.
  6. 240 points: properal's comment in Were doomed: "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's 70% tax on the super-rich is more popular than Trump's tax cuts, new poll shows" --- democracy sucks.
  7. 239 points: MizchiefKilz's comment in Americans Continue to Flee to Low-Tax States
  8. 235 points: TheKleen's comment in Don’t Lower the Voting Age, Raise It
  9. 231 points: Boltrag's comment in After Winning a $15 Minimum Wage, Fast Food Workers Now Battle Unfair Firings
  10. 229 points: MarshmellowPotatoPie's comment in Does that sound like a work of a journalist?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Reddit and the Struggle to Detoxify the Internet - by Andrew Marantz (The New Yorker) 18 March 2018 (1 of 2)

https://archive.is/Z9O4E
(Part One of Two)
Which Web sites get the most traffic? According to the ranking service Alexa, the top three sites in the United States, as of this writing, are Google, YouTube, and Facebook. (Porn, somewhat hearteningly, doesn’t crack the top ten.) The rankings don’t reflect everything—the dark Web, the nouveau-riche recluses harvesting bitcoin—but, for the most part, people online go where you’d expect them to go. The only truly surprising entry, in fourth place, is Reddit, whose astronomical popularity seems at odds with the fact that many Americans have only vaguely heard of the site and have no real understanding of what it is. A link aggregator? A microblogging platform? A social network?
To its devotees, Reddit feels proudly untamed, one of the last Internet giants to resist homogeneity. Most Reddit pages have a throwback aesthetic, with a few crudely designed graphics and a tangle of text: an original post, comments on the post, responses to the comments, responses to the responses. That’s pretty much it. Reddit is made up of more than a million individual communities, or subreddits, some of which have three subscribers, some twenty million. Every subreddit is devoted to a specific kind of content, ranging from vital to trivial: News, Politics, Trees (for marijuana enthusiasts), MarijuanaEnthusiasts (for tree enthusiasts), MildlyInteresting (“for photos that are, you know, mildly interesting”). Some people end up on Reddit by accident, find it baffling, and never visit again. But people who do use it—redditors, as they’re called—often use it all day long, to the near-exclusion of anything else. “For a while, we called ourselves the front page of the Internet,” Steve Huffman, Reddit’s C.E.O., said recently. “These days, I tend to say that we’re a place for open and honest conversations—‘open and honest’ meaning authentic, meaning messy, meaning the best and worst and realest and weirdest parts of humanity.”
On November 23, 2016, shortly after President Trump’s election, Huffman was at his desk, in San Francisco, perusing the site. It was the day before Thanksgiving. Reddit’s administrators had just deleted a subreddit called Pizzagate, a forum for people who believed that high-ranking staffers of Hillary Clinton’s Presidential campaign, and possibly Clinton herself, were trafficking child sex slaves. The evidence, as extensive as it was unpersuasive, included satanic rituals, a map printed on a handkerchief, and an elaborate code involving the words “cheese” and “pizza.” In only fifteen days of existence, the Pizzagate subreddit had attracted twenty thousand subscribers. Now, in its place, was a scrubbed white page with the message “This community has been banned.”
The reason for the ban, according to Reddit’s administrators, was not the beliefs of people on the subreddit, but the way they’d behaved—specifically, their insistence on publishing their enemies’ private phone numbers and addresses, a clear violation of Reddit’s rules. The conspiracy theorists, in turn, claimed that they’d been banned because Reddit administrators were part of the conspiracy. (Less than two weeks after Pizzagate was banned, a man fired a semiautomatic rifle inside a D.C. pizzeria called Comet Ping Pong, in an attempt to “self-investigate” claims that the restaurant’s basement was a dungeon full of kidnapped children. Comet Ping Pong does not have a basement.)
Some of the conspiracy theorists left Reddit and reunited on Voat, a site made by and for the users that Reddit sloughs off. (Many social networks have such Bizarro networks, which brand themselves as strongholds of free speech and in practice are often used for hate speech. People banned from Twitter end up on Gab; people banned from Patreon end up on Hatreon.) Other Pizzagaters stayed and regrouped on The_Donald, a popular pro-Trump subreddit. Throughout the Presidential campaign, The_Donald was a hive of Trump boosterism. By this time, it had become a hermetic subculture, full of inside jokes and ugly rhetoric. The community’s most frequent commenters, like the man they’d helped propel to the Presidency, were experts at testing boundaries. Within minutes, they started to express their outrage that Pizzagate had been deleted.
Redditors are pseudonymous, and their pseudonyms are sometimes prefaced by “u,” for “username.” Huffman’s is Spez. As he scanned The_Donald, he noticed that hundreds of the most popular comments were about him:
“fuck u/spez
“u/spez is complicit in the coverup”
“u/spez supports child rape”
One commenter simply wrote “u/SPEZ IS A CUCK,” in bold type, a hundred and ten times in a row.
Huffman, alone at his computer, wondered whether to respond. “I consider myself a troll at heart,” he said later. “Making people bristle, being a little outrageous in order to add some spice to life—I get that. I’ve done that.” Privately, Huffman imagined The_Donald as a misguided teen-ager who wouldn’t stop misbehaving. “If your little brother flicks your ear, maybe you ignore it,” he said. “If he flicks your ear a hundred times, or punches you, then maybe you give him a little smack to show you’re paying attention.”
Although redditors didn’t yet know it, Huffman could edit any part of the site. He wrote a script that would automatically replace his username with those of The_Donald’s most prominent members, directing the insults back at the insulters in real time: in one comment, “Fuck u/Spez” became “Fuck u/Trumpshaker”; in another, “Fuck u/Spez” became “Fuck u/MAGAdocious.”
The_Donald’s users saw what was happening, and they reacted by spinning a conspiracy theory that, in this case, turned out to be true.
“Manipulating the words of your users is fucked,” a commenter wrote.
“Even Facebook and Twitter haven’t stooped this low.”
“Trust nothing.”
The incident became known as Spezgiving, and it’s still invoked, internally and externally, as a paradigmatic example of tech-executive overreach. Social-media platforms must do something to rein in their users, the consensus goes, but not that.
Huffman can no longer edit the site indiscriminately, but his actions laid bare a fact that most social-media companies go to great lengths to conceal—that, no matter how neutral a platform may seem, there’s always a person behind the curtain. “I fucked up,” Huffman wrote in an apology the following week. “More than anything, I want Reddit to heal, and I want our country to heal.” Implicit in his apology was a set of questions, perhaps the central questions facing anyone who worries about the current state of civic discourse. Is it possible to facilitate a space for open dialogue without also facilitating hoaxes, harassment, and threats of violence? Where is the line between authenticity and toxicity? What if, after technology allows us to reveal our inner voices, what we learn is that many of us are authentically toxic?
The only way to understand the Internet, at least at first, was by metaphor. “Web” and “page” and “superhighway” are metaphors. So are “link,” “viral,” “post,” and “stream.” Last year, the Supreme Court heard a case about whether it was constitutional to bar registered sex offenders from using social media. In order to answer that question, the Justices had to ask another question: What is social media? In sixty minutes of oral argument, Facebook was compared to a park, a playground, an airport terminal, a polling place, and a town square.
It might be most helpful to compare a social network to a party. The party starts out small, with the hosts and a few of their friends. Then word gets out and strangers show up. People take cues from the environment. Mimosas in a sun-dappled atrium suggest one kind of mood; grain alcohol in a moldy basement suggests another. Sometimes, a pattern emerges on its own. Pinterest, a simple photo-sharing site founded by three men, happened to catch on among women aspiring to an urbane life style, and today the front page is often a collage of merino scarves and expensive glassware. In other cases, the gatekeeping seems more premeditated. If you’re fourteen, Snapchat’s user interface is intuitive; if you’re twenty-two, it’s intriguing; if you’re over thirty-five, it’s impenetrable. This encourages old people to self-deport.
Huffman and his college roommate, Alexis Ohanian, founded Reddit a few weeks after graduating from the University of Virginia, in 2005. The first people to show up were, like the co-founders, the kind of strong-headed young men who got excited about computer programming, video games, and edgy, self-referential humor. Reddit’s system was purely democratic, which is to say anarchic. Anyone could post any link, and the ones that got the most “upvotes” would rise to the top of a page. At the time, Facebook was available only to college students, and before joining it you had to provide your real name, your birthday, and a valid school e-mail address—the equivalent of being carded at the door. To join Reddit, all you needed was a username that hadn’t been claimed yet. You could start as many anonymous accounts as you wanted, which gave rise to creativity, and also to mischief.
Back then, Ohanian was ungainly and clean-shaven, and he was often photographed in a hoodie and with a goofy smile. At his wedding, last year, wearing a beard and an Armani tuxedo, he was nearly unrecognizable. (The paparazzi weren’t too interested in him, though, given that his bride was Serena Williams.) Huffman, on the other hand, has always looked more or less the same: bright-blue eyes, chipmunk teeth, and a thatch of blond hair.
A few months after Reddit launched, Huffman created the first constraints. People were posting links to vulgar and violent content—which was fine, except that Huffman wanted users to have some idea of what they were about to click on, so that they could avoid, say, inadvertently opening porn in front of their bosses. Huffman labelled some content N.S.F.W.—not safe for work—and separated it from everything else. That was the end of pure democracy.
In 2006, Ohanian and Huffman sold Reddit to Condé Nast, a media conglomerate that owns more than twenty magazines, including this one. (Reddit now operates independently.) The sale made them twenty-two-year-old millionaires, but they didn’t fit in at a large corporation, and three years later they left. In their absence, the party got bigger and weirder, and ominous cliques started to gather in the corners. One popular subreddit, Jailbait, was devoted to sexually suggestive photos of young-looking women. This was profoundly creepy, but probably not illegal—the subreddit’s users swore that all the women in the photos were eighteen or older—and Reddit allowed the community to grow. In September of 2011, Anderson Cooper discussed the subreddit on CNN. “It’s pretty amazing that a big corporation would have something like this, which reflects badly on it,” he said. Traffic to Jailbait quadrupled overnight. Twelve days later, after someone in the group apparently shared a nude photo of a fourteen-year-old girl, the community was banned. And yet the founder of Jailbait, an infamous troll who went by u/Violentacrez, was allowed to stay on Reddit, as were some four hundred other communities he’d created—Jewmerica, ChokeABitch, and worse. (Yes, it gets worse.)
Yishan Wong, an engineer who had worked at Facebook, was then Reddit’s C.E.O. He implied that he’d banned Jailbait only because the subreddit had violated U.S. law. “We stand for free speech,” he wrote in an internal post, in 2012. Reddit’s goal, he continued, was to “become a universal platform for human discourse.” Therefore, “it would not do if, in our youth, we decided to censor things simply because they were distasteful.”
At the time, Wong’s free-speech absolutism was ubiquitous in Silicon Valley. Twitter’s executives referred to their company as “the free-speech wing of the free-speech party.” Facebook’s original self-description, “an online directory that connects people through social networks at colleges,” had evolved into a grandiose mission statement: “Facebook gives people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.” With the Arab Spring fresh in everyone’s mind, few questioned the assumption that “giving people the power” would inevitably lead to social progress. Barack Obama, who had been carried into office by a social-media groundswell, often expressed a similar optimism about the salubrious effects of the Internet. “In the twenty-first century, information is power,” Obama said in a 2011 speech on Middle East policy. “The truth cannot be hidden. . . . Such open discourse is important even if what is said does not square with our worldview.”
Wong left the company in 2014, after two and a half years. His successor was Ellen Pao, a former venture capitalist. She lasted eight months. Early in her tenure, Reddit announced a crackdown on involuntary pornography. If you found a compromising photo of yourself circulating on Reddit without your consent, you could report it and the company would remove it. In retrospect, this seems like a straightforward business decision, but some redditors treated it as the first in an inevitable parade of horrors. “This rule is stupid and suppresses our rights,” u/penisfuckermcgee commented.
A few months later, Reddit banned five of its most egregious communities, including FatPeopleHate and ShitNiggersSay. Again redditors were apoplectic (“We may as well take a one way ticket to North Korea”). Almost every day, strident misogynists called Pao a tyrant, an “Asian slut,” or worse. (Yes, it gets worse.) She resigned in July, 2015. “The Internet started as a bastion for free expression,” she wrote in the Washington Post. “But that balancing act is getting harder. The trolls are winning.”
Over time, social networks have turned into institutions. More than two billion people now use Facebook. In other words, the company has achieved its mission of making the world more connected. In 2016, that meant, among other things, making the American electorate more connected to white supremacists, armed militias, Macedonian fake-news merchants, and micro-targeted campaign ads purchased in rubles. “I continue to believe Mr. Trump will not be President,” Obama said that year, despite the mounting aggression in some online forums. “And the reason is because I have a lot of faith in the American people.” (In response to Obama’s remarks, a commenter on The_Donald wrote, “FUCK THAT LOW ENERGY CUCK!”)
Shortly after the election, Brad Parscale, the Trump campaign’s top digital strategist, told Wired, “Facebook and Twitter were the reason we won this thing.” Reddit was also an important part of Trump’s strategy. Parscale wrote—on Reddit, naturally—that “members here provided considerable growth and reach to our campaign.” The_Donald, in particular, proved a fecund host cell for viral memes. On July 2, 2016, Trump tweeted a photo collage of Hillary Clinton, piles of cash, and the phrase “Most Corrupt Candidate Ever!” written inside a six-pointed star. When Trump’s critics called attention to the image’s anti-Semitic implications, The_Donald’s users rushed to Trump’s defense, posting photos of other six-pointed stars in innocuous contexts. “Where is the outrage from the liberal left on this one?” a user wrote, beneath a photo of a “Frozen”-themed sticker book with a star on its cover. A few hours later, Trump tweeted the same photo, with a version of the same question, followed by “Dishonest media! #Frozen.”
During the campaign, Trump, or someone typing on his behalf, participated in Reddit’s signature interview format—an A.M.A., for “ask me anything.” In response to a question about the “protected class of media elites,” Trump wrote, “I have been very concerned about media bias and the total dishonesty of the press. I think new media is a great way to get out the truth.” This drew hundreds of jubilant comments (u/RAINBOW_DILDO: “daddy YES”; u/CantContheDon: “WE’RE THE MEDIA NOW”).
The_Donald, with more than half a million subscribers, is by far the biggest pro-Trump subreddit, but it ranks just below No. 150 on the list of all subreddits; it’s roughly the same size as CryptoCurrency and ComicBooks. “Some people on The_Donald are expressing their genuine political beliefs, and obviously that’s something we want to encourage,” Huffman said. “Others are maybe not expressing sincere beliefs, but are treating it more like a game—If I post this ridiculous or offensive thing, can I get people to upvote it? And then some people, to quote ‘The Dark Knight,’ just want to watch the world burn.” On some smaller far-right subreddits, the discourse is more unhinged. One, created in July of 2016, was called Physical_Removal. According to its “About Us” section, it was a subreddit for people who believe that liberals “qualify to get a helicopter ride.” “Helicopter ride,” an allusion to Augusto Pinochet’s reputed habit of throwing Communists out of helicopters, is alt-right slang for murder.
The_Donald accounts for less than one per cent of Reddit’s traffic, but it occupies far more than one per cent of the Reddit-wide conversation. Trolls set a cunning trap. By ignoring their provocations, you risk seeming complicit. By responding, you amplify their message. Trump, perhaps the world’s most skilled troll, can get attention whenever he wants, simply by being outrageous. Traditional journalists and editors can decide to resist the bait, and sometimes they do, but that option isn’t available on user-generated platforms. Social-media executives claim to transcend subjectivity, and they have designed their platforms to be feedback machines, giving us not what we claim to want, nor what might be good for us, but what we actually pay attention to.
There are no good solutions to this problem, and so tech executives tend to discuss it as seldom as possible, and only in the airiest of platitudes. Twitter has rebuffed repeated calls to ban President Trump’s account, despite his many apparent violations of company policy. (If tweeting that North Korea “won’t be around much longer” doesn’t break Twitter’s rule against “specific threats of violence,” it’s not clear what would.) Last fall, on his Facebook page, Mark Zuckerberg addressed—sort of, obliquely—the widespread critique that his company was exacerbating political polarization. “We’ll keep working to ensure the integrity of free and fair elections around the world, and to ensure our community is a platform for all ideas and force for good in democracy,” he wrote, then stepped away as a global howl of frustration grew in the comments.
I asked a few social-media executives to talk to me about all this. I didn’t expect definitive answers, I told them; I just wanted to hear them think through the questions. Unsurprisingly, no one jumped at the chance. Twitter mostly ignored my e-mails. Snapchat’s P.R. representatives had breakfast with me once, then ignored my e-mails. Facebook’s representatives talked to me for weeks, asking precise, intelligent questions, before they started to ignore my e-mails.
Reddit has more reason to be transparent. It’s big, but doesn’t feel indispensable to most Internet users or, for that matter, to most advertisers. Moreover, Anderson Cooper’s CNN segment was hardly the only bit of vividly terrible press that Reddit has received over the years. All social networks contain vitriol and bigotry, but not all social networks are equally associated with these things in the public imagination. Recently, I typed “Reddit is” into Google. Three of the top suggested auto-completions were “toxic,” “cancer,” and “hot garbage.”
Huffman, after leaving Condé Nast, spent a few months backpacking in Costa Rica, then founded a travel company called Hipmunk. In July, 2015, he returned to Reddit as C.E.O. In a post about his “top priority” in the job, he wrote, “The overwhelming majority of content on reddit comes from wonderful, creative, funny, smart, and silly communities. There is also a dark side, communities whose purpose is reprehensible, and we don’t have any obligation to support them. . . . Neither Alexis nor I created reddit to be a bastion of free speech.” This was shocking, and about half true. When free-speech absolutism was in vogue, Reddit’s co-founders were as susceptible to its appeal as anyone. In 2012, a Forbes reporter asked Ohanian how the Founding Fathers might have reacted to Reddit. “A bastion of free speech on the World Wide Web? I bet they would like it,” Ohanian responded. “I would love to imagine that ‘Common Sense’ would have been a self-post on Reddit, by Thomas Paine, or actually a redditor named T_Paine.”
Still, Ohanian and Huffman never took their own rhetoric too literally. The site’s rules were brief and vague, and their unwritten policy was even simpler. “We always banned people,” Huffman told me. “We just didn’t talk about it very much.” Because Reddit was so small, and misbehavior relatively rare, Huffman could do most of the banning himself, on an ad-hoc basis. “It wasn’t well thought out or even articulated, really. It was ‘That guy has the N-word in his username? Fuck that.’ Delete account.”
As C.E.O., Huffman continued the trend Pao had started, banning a few viciously racist subreddits such as Coontown. “There was pushback,” Huffman told me. “But I had the moral authority, as the founder, to take it in stride.” If Pao was like a forbearing parent, then Huffman’s style was closer to “I brought you into this world, and I can take you out of it.” “Yes, I know that it’s really hard to define hate speech, and I know that any way we define it has the potential to set a dangerous precedent,” he told me. “I also know that a community called Coontown is not good for Reddit.” In most cases, Reddit didn’t suspend individual users’ accounts, Huffman said: “We just took away the spaces where they liked to hang out, and went, ‘Let’s see if this helps.’ ”
Reddit’s headquarters, in a former radio tower in downtown San Francisco, look like a stereotypical startup office: high concrete ceilings, a large common area with beer and kombucha on tap. Each desk is decorated aggressively with personal flair—a “Make Reddit Great Again” hat, a glossy print magazine called Meme Insider. Working at Reddit requires paying close anthropological attention to the motley tastes of redditors, and it’s not uncommon to see groups of fit, well-dressed employees cheerfully discussing the most recent post on CatDimension or PeopleFuckingDying.
The first morning I visited the office, I ran into Huffman, who was wearing jeans, a T-shirt, and Adidas indoor-soccer shoes, as he tried to persuade an employee to buy a ticket to Burning Man. Huffman is far more unfiltered than other social-media executives, and every time he and I talked in the presence of Reddit’s head of P.R., he said at least one thing that made her wince. “There’s only one Steve,” Ohanian told me. “No matter when you catch him, for better or worse, that’s the Steve you’re gonna get.” I had a list of delicate topics that I planned to ask Huffman about eventually, including allegations of vote manipulation on Reddit’s front page and his personal feelings about Trump. Huffman raised all of them himself on the first day. “My political views might not be exactly what you’d predict,” he said. “I’m a gun owner, for example. And I don’t care all that much about politics, compared to other things.” He speaks in quick bursts, with an alpha-nerd combination of introversion and confidence. His opinion about Trump is that he is incompetent and that his Presidency has mostly been a failure. But, he told me, “I’m open to counterarguments.”
That afternoon, I watched Huffman make a sales pitch to a group of executives from a New York advertising agency. Like many platforms, Reddit has struggled to convert its huge audience into a stable revenue stream, and its representatives spend a lot of time trying to convince potential advertisers that Reddit is not hot garbage. Huffman sat at the head of a long table, facing a dozen men and women in suits. The “snarky, libertarian” ethos of early Reddit, he said, “mostly came from me as a twenty-one-year-old. I’ve since grown out of that, to the relief of everyone.” The executives nodded and chuckled. “We had a lot of baggage,” he continued. “We let the story get away from us. And now we’re trying to get our shit together.”
Later, Huffman told me that getting Reddit’s shit together would require continual intervention. “I don’t think I’m going to leave the office one Friday and go, ‘Mission accomplished—we fixed the Internet,’ ” he said. “Every day, you keep visiting different parts of the site, opening this random door or that random door—‘What’s it like in here? Does this feel like a shitty place to be? No, people are generally having a good time, nobody’s hatching any evil plots, nobody’s crying. O.K., great.’ And you move on to the next room.”
In January, Facebook announced that it would make news less visible in its users’ feeds. “Facebook was originally designed to connect friends and family—and it has excelled at that,” a product manager named Samidh Chakrabarti wrote on a company blog. “But as unprecedented numbers of people channel their political energy through this medium, it’s being used in unforeseen ways with societal repercussions that were never anticipated.” It wasn’t the most effusive mea culpa in history, but by Facebook’s standards it amounted to wailing and gnashing of teeth. “We want to make sure that our products are not just fun, but are good for people,” Mark Zuckerberg told the Times. Direct pronouncements from him are so rare that even this pabulum was treated as push-alert-worthy news.
(Continued Part Two of Two - https://www.reddit.com/CapitalistParadise/comments/842ouv/reddit_and_the_struggle_to_detoxify_the_internet/?st=jepf79wf&sh=eaa395fc )
https://archive.is/Z9O4E
submitted by FinnagainsAwake to uncensored [link] [comments]

Im a bitcoin millionaire and it has ruined my life.

I want to start this out by saying this is one of my first real posts on reddit so i apologize if its structured bad or if its rambly. I also want to stress that I simply got lucky and Im not some entitled rich kid who never had to work for anything. I just need to vent and hopefully get some advice. TL;DR at bottom.
When I was 11 I wanted to be a app developer so I mowed lawns, shoved drives and did pretty much anything i could to to get enough money to buy a MacBook. After working for a year or so I had a couple thousand dollars and bought said MacBook for my birthday as a present for myself. I also bought roughly 1,000 Bitcoins for $0.80 a piece since my friend and computer science teacher told me it would be the next big thing. I sold all my Bitcoins on November 28th of last year for roughly $10,000 a piece and ever since my life has been a living hell. My parents and family think I'm their personal bank, I lost all my friends and found out that depression + isolation is a very toxic combination.
For the most part at school I had 3 friends I was extremely close to Kyle, Chris and Gavin (Not their real names of course). We were the rejected ADD kids who liked Minecraft and “hacking” so we became friends fast. Out of them Kyle was my best-friend and we would spend hours messing around in bash and making stupid viruses that wouldn’t work half the time but it was the most fun I’ve ever had in my life. In 2011 we got to take our first electives so we all took computer science which was basically an hour where we joked around and learned C. Around this time Chris wanted to be a real “hacker” so he went onto some forms and found someone selling a tutorial book for hacking into facebook and other social accounts and bought it with some bitcoin. He later told us about it and we all decided we would buy some since we all had some type of job over the summer. About year later a bitcoin was worth roughly $1,000 and all my friends cashed out. At 13-14 years old they all had at least $100,000 a piece and were total dicks about it spending money on shit they didn’t even want and acting like they were better then everyone else. I didn’t cash out because I liked the rush of it going up and down. Fast forward to now and they want nothing to do with me because I’m a depressed piece of shit and a constant reminder to them what could have been if they kept theirs instead of selling them off to quick. On top of this they are working on a startup without me which hurts because we dreamed about doing that as young teens.
My parents never had a lot of money so when I told them about what happened they were both thrilled. I feel like I should preface this by saying my mom and dad have been more like roommates to me growing up and never really took on the parent role. I’m on the autistic spectrum so growing up nothing was expected and as long as I didn’t hurt myself or someone else they didn’t care. That being said I think they are fairly immature and lack the responsibility that comes with having any kind of exposable wealth. My dad quit his job the next week (1 year from retirement mind you) and my mom took my sister shopping for jewelry and designer clothes because “My sons a millionaire I can do what I want”. I have nothing against them spending a little money and rewarding themselves because hey they raised me and I owe them a lot but they are acting like spoiled brats and idiots. They are buying everything they have ever wanted and have pretty much destroyed their savings account because “You’re my retirement plan now kiddo”. Spending money is okay in my book but at the rate they’re going ill be out of it by the time I’m 40. When ever I tell my mom or dad that they don’t need something they either guilt me with “I worked my whole life so you could have a better one and this is how you act” or “You have so much now and you can’t spare a little bit to make someone else happy? I never knew I raised such a selfish person.”
At our Christmas get together this year I was treated like a fucking king. I had people who have maybe spoken 10 words to me my entire life coming up and acting like we’re best friends. Of course this lead to them asking for money in some way or shape. My cousin wants to send her kids to Disney, my Aunt needs help with her mortgage, my Uncle needs money to keep his restaurant and my Grandma asked for some money to help with my Grandpa. I did give my Grandma some money so she could get an aid for my Grandpa but the rest of these people are starting to ask for a little much in my opinion. As I said before I don’t care if they want a little money but its how you ask and what its for. The way they are treating me is as if they feel entitled to some money instead of it being a gift. Of course I said yes to most of their requests but now they continue to ask for help with more and more and when I say no my parents treat me like I’m being selfish and talk shit behind my back.
The worst part of all of this is now I lack motivation to do anything because I’ve already "won" at the game of life. I dropped out of college because i figured what's the point of going to classes learning something that you already know when you could be doing something that you love and I’m still trying to find that something. I try to force myself to work by contributing to open source projects or building something useful but it feels like there's no point. I don’t have that fire of excitement I had when I was a kid. I literally see no point in doing anything. I also feel incredibly guilty because I have the freedom and privilege to not have to work while everyone does. My life now consists of me waking up, getting high in my hammock, lurking reddit, listening to sad vibe music and waiting to go to bed. Pretty much everything that I loved has either become boring or triggers me. I used to love anime, video games and playing music but now it only reminds me of my old friends and makes me more depressed then I’ve ever been. I started going to a therapist (which my dad thought was funny) and she told me I might have depression and some anxiety issues so I should go see a psychiatrist and get myself checked out but I know myself and thats not for me. I feel like I have no purpose in life and everything is crashing before my eyes
I don’t know what I’m looking for but maybe someone here has experienced something similar and can offer advice on how to deal with this drama. I’ve been told by many people online that I should move to Florida or California to get away from everything and clear my head for a bit but it seems like id be running from my problems instead of dealing with them. Sorry if this post sounds like me whining but I don’t really have anyone I can go to for advice or help. Im just really lost right now.
TL;DR: Got that bitcoin money, my family wants me to buy them everything, friends left and I’m depressed and lonely
submitted by Richkidproblems55432 to offmychest [link] [comments]

Reddit and the Struggle to Detoxify the Internet - by Andrew Marantz (The New Yorker) 18 March 2018 (1 of 2)

https://archive.is/Z9O4E
(Part One of Two)
Which Web sites get the most traffic? According to the ranking service Alexa, the top three sites in the United States, as of this writing, are Google, YouTube, and Facebook. (Porn, somewhat hearteningly, doesn’t crack the top ten.) The rankings don’t reflect everything—the dark Web, the nouveau-riche recluses harvesting bitcoin—but, for the most part, people online go where you’d expect them to go. The only truly surprising entry, in fourth place, is Reddit, whose astronomical popularity seems at odds with the fact that many Americans have only vaguely heard of the site and have no real understanding of what it is. A link aggregator? A microblogging platform? A social network?
To its devotees, Reddit feels proudly untamed, one of the last Internet giants to resist homogeneity. Most Reddit pages have a throwback aesthetic, with a few crudely designed graphics and a tangle of text: an original post, comments on the post, responses to the comments, responses to the responses. That’s pretty much it. Reddit is made up of more than a million individual communities, or subreddits, some of which have three subscribers, some twenty million. Every subreddit is devoted to a specific kind of content, ranging from vital to trivial: News, Politics, Trees (for marijuana enthusiasts), MarijuanaEnthusiasts (for tree enthusiasts), MildlyInteresting (“for photos that are, you know, mildly interesting”). Some people end up on Reddit by accident, find it baffling, and never visit again. But people who do use it—redditors, as they’re called—often use it all day long, to the near-exclusion of anything else. “For a while, we called ourselves the front page of the Internet,” Steve Huffman, Reddit’s C.E.O., said recently. “These days, I tend to say that we’re a place for open and honest conversations—‘open and honest’ meaning authentic, meaning messy, meaning the best and worst and realest and weirdest parts of humanity.”
On November 23, 2016, shortly after President Trump’s election, Huffman was at his desk, in San Francisco, perusing the site. It was the day before Thanksgiving. Reddit’s administrators had just deleted a subreddit called Pizzagate, a forum for people who believed that high-ranking staffers of Hillary Clinton’s Presidential campaign, and possibly Clinton herself, were trafficking child sex slaves. The evidence, as extensive as it was unpersuasive, included satanic rituals, a map printed on a handkerchief, and an elaborate code involving the words “cheese” and “pizza.” In only fifteen days of existence, the Pizzagate subreddit had attracted twenty thousand subscribers. Now, in its place, was a scrubbed white page with the message “This community has been banned.”
The reason for the ban, according to Reddit’s administrators, was not the beliefs of people on the subreddit, but the way they’d behaved—specifically, their insistence on publishing their enemies’ private phone numbers and addresses, a clear violation of Reddit’s rules. The conspiracy theorists, in turn, claimed that they’d been banned because Reddit administrators were part of the conspiracy. (Less than two weeks after Pizzagate was banned, a man fired a semiautomatic rifle inside a D.C. pizzeria called Comet Ping Pong, in an attempt to “self-investigate” claims that the restaurant’s basement was a dungeon full of kidnapped children. Comet Ping Pong does not have a basement.)
Some of the conspiracy theorists left Reddit and reunited on Voat, a site made by and for the users that Reddit sloughs off. (Many social networks have such Bizarro networks, which brand themselves as strongholds of free speech and in practice are often used for hate speech. People banned from Twitter end up on Gab; people banned from Patreon end up on Hatreon.) Other Pizzagaters stayed and regrouped on The_Donald, a popular pro-Trump subreddit. Throughout the Presidential campaign, The_Donald was a hive of Trump boosterism. By this time, it had become a hermetic subculture, full of inside jokes and ugly rhetoric. The community’s most frequent commenters, like the man they’d helped propel to the Presidency, were experts at testing boundaries. Within minutes, they started to express their outrage that Pizzagate had been deleted.
Redditors are pseudonymous, and their pseudonyms are sometimes prefaced by “u,” for “username.” Huffman’s is Spez. As he scanned The_Donald, he noticed that hundreds of the most popular comments were about him:
“fuck u/spez
“u/spez is complicit in the coverup”
“u/spez supports child rape”
One commenter simply wrote “u/SPEZ IS A CUCK,” in bold type, a hundred and ten times in a row.
Huffman, alone at his computer, wondered whether to respond. “I consider myself a troll at heart,” he said later. “Making people bristle, being a little outrageous in order to add some spice to life—I get that. I’ve done that.” Privately, Huffman imagined The_Donald as a misguided teen-ager who wouldn’t stop misbehaving. “If your little brother flicks your ear, maybe you ignore it,” he said. “If he flicks your ear a hundred times, or punches you, then maybe you give him a little smack to show you’re paying attention.”
Although redditors didn’t yet know it, Huffman could edit any part of the site. He wrote a script that would automatically replace his username with those of The_Donald’s most prominent members, directing the insults back at the insulters in real time: in one comment, “Fuck u/Spez” became “Fuck u/Trumpshaker”; in another, “Fuck u/Spez” became “Fuck u/MAGAdocious.”
The_Donald’s users saw what was happening, and they reacted by spinning a conspiracy theory that, in this case, turned out to be true.
“Manipulating the words of your users is fucked,” a commenter wrote.
“Even Facebook and Twitter haven’t stooped this low.”
“Trust nothing.”
The incident became known as Spezgiving, and it’s still invoked, internally and externally, as a paradigmatic example of tech-executive overreach. Social-media platforms must do something to rein in their users, the consensus goes, but not that.
Huffman can no longer edit the site indiscriminately, but his actions laid bare a fact that most social-media companies go to great lengths to conceal—that, no matter how neutral a platform may seem, there’s always a person behind the curtain. “I fucked up,” Huffman wrote in an apology the following week. “More than anything, I want Reddit to heal, and I want our country to heal.” Implicit in his apology was a set of questions, perhaps the central questions facing anyone who worries about the current state of civic discourse. Is it possible to facilitate a space for open dialogue without also facilitating hoaxes, harassment, and threats of violence? Where is the line between authenticity and toxicity? What if, after technology allows us to reveal our inner voices, what we learn is that many of us are authentically toxic?
The only way to understand the Internet, at least at first, was by metaphor. “Web” and “page” and “superhighway” are metaphors. So are “link,” “viral,” “post,” and “stream.” Last year, the Supreme Court heard a case about whether it was constitutional to bar registered sex offenders from using social media. In order to answer that question, the Justices had to ask another question: What is social media? In sixty minutes of oral argument, Facebook was compared to a park, a playground, an airport terminal, a polling place, and a town square.
It might be most helpful to compare a social network to a party. The party starts out small, with the hosts and a few of their friends. Then word gets out and strangers show up. People take cues from the environment. Mimosas in a sun-dappled atrium suggest one kind of mood; grain alcohol in a moldy basement suggests another. Sometimes, a pattern emerges on its own. Pinterest, a simple photo-sharing site founded by three men, happened to catch on among women aspiring to an urbane life style, and today the front page is often a collage of merino scarves and expensive glassware. In other cases, the gatekeeping seems more premeditated. If you’re fourteen, Snapchat’s user interface is intuitive; if you’re twenty-two, it’s intriguing; if you’re over thirty-five, it’s impenetrable. This encourages old people to self-deport.
Huffman and his college roommate, Alexis Ohanian, founded Reddit a few weeks after graduating from the University of Virginia, in 2005. The first people to show up were, like the co-founders, the kind of strong-headed young men who got excited about computer programming, video games, and edgy, self-referential humor. Reddit’s system was purely democratic, which is to say anarchic. Anyone could post any link, and the ones that got the most “upvotes” would rise to the top of a page. At the time, Facebook was available only to college students, and before joining it you had to provide your real name, your birthday, and a valid school e-mail address—the equivalent of being carded at the door. To join Reddit, all you needed was a username that hadn’t been claimed yet. You could start as many anonymous accounts as you wanted, which gave rise to creativity, and also to mischief.
Back then, Ohanian was ungainly and clean-shaven, and he was often photographed in a hoodie and with a goofy smile. At his wedding, last year, wearing a beard and an Armani tuxedo, he was nearly unrecognizable. (The paparazzi weren’t too interested in him, though, given that his bride was Serena Williams.) Huffman, on the other hand, has always looked more or less the same: bright-blue eyes, chipmunk teeth, and a thatch of blond hair.
A few months after Reddit launched, Huffman created the first constraints. People were posting links to vulgar and violent content—which was fine, except that Huffman wanted users to have some idea of what they were about to click on, so that they could avoid, say, inadvertently opening porn in front of their bosses. Huffman labelled some content N.S.F.W.—not safe for work—and separated it from everything else. That was the end of pure democracy.
In 2006, Ohanian and Huffman sold Reddit to Condé Nast, a media conglomerate that owns more than twenty magazines, including this one. (Reddit now operates independently.) The sale made them twenty-two-year-old millionaires, but they didn’t fit in at a large corporation, and three years later they left. In their absence, the party got bigger and weirder, and ominous cliques started to gather in the corners. One popular subreddit, Jailbait, was devoted to sexually suggestive photos of young-looking women. This was profoundly creepy, but probably not illegal—the subreddit’s users swore that all the women in the photos were eighteen or older—and Reddit allowed the community to grow. In September of 2011, Anderson Cooper discussed the subreddit on CNN. “It’s pretty amazing that a big corporation would have something like this, which reflects badly on it,” he said. Traffic to Jailbait quadrupled overnight. Twelve days later, after someone in the group apparently shared a nude photo of a fourteen-year-old girl, the community was banned. And yet the founder of Jailbait, an infamous troll who went by u/Violentacrez, was allowed to stay on Reddit, as were some four hundred other communities he’d created—Jewmerica, ChokeABitch, and worse. (Yes, it gets worse.)
Yishan Wong, an engineer who had worked at Facebook, was then Reddit’s C.E.O. He implied that he’d banned Jailbait only because the subreddit had violated U.S. law. “We stand for free speech,” he wrote in an internal post, in 2012. Reddit’s goal, he continued, was to “become a universal platform for human discourse.” Therefore, “it would not do if, in our youth, we decided to censor things simply because they were distasteful.”
At the time, Wong’s free-speech absolutism was ubiquitous in Silicon Valley. Twitter’s executives referred to their company as “the free-speech wing of the free-speech party.” Facebook’s original self-description, “an online directory that connects people through social networks at colleges,” had evolved into a grandiose mission statement: “Facebook gives people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.” With the Arab Spring fresh in everyone’s mind, few questioned the assumption that “giving people the power” would inevitably lead to social progress. Barack Obama, who had been carried into office by a social-media groundswell, often expressed a similar optimism about the salubrious effects of the Internet. “In the twenty-first century, information is power,” Obama said in a 2011 speech on Middle East policy. “The truth cannot be hidden. . . . Such open discourse is important even if what is said does not square with our worldview.”
Wong left the company in 2014, after two and a half years. His successor was Ellen Pao, a former venture capitalist. She lasted eight months. Early in her tenure, Reddit announced a crackdown on involuntary pornography. If you found a compromising photo of yourself circulating on Reddit without your consent, you could report it and the company would remove it. In retrospect, this seems like a straightforward business decision, but some redditors treated it as the first in an inevitable parade of horrors. “This rule is stupid and suppresses our rights,” u/penisfuckermcgee commented.
A few months later, Reddit banned five of its most egregious communities, including FatPeopleHate and ShitNiggersSay. Again redditors were apoplectic (“We may as well take a one way ticket to North Korea”). Almost every day, strident misogynists called Pao a tyrant, an “Asian slut,” or worse. (Yes, it gets worse.) She resigned in July, 2015. “The Internet started as a bastion for free expression,” she wrote in the Washington Post. “But that balancing act is getting harder. The trolls are winning.”
Over time, social networks have turned into institutions. More than two billion people now use Facebook. In other words, the company has achieved its mission of making the world more connected. In 2016, that meant, among other things, making the American electorate more connected to white supremacists, armed militias, Macedonian fake-news merchants, and micro-targeted campaign ads purchased in rubles. “I continue to believe Mr. Trump will not be President,” Obama said that year, despite the mounting aggression in some online forums. “And the reason is because I have a lot of faith in the American people.” (In response to Obama’s remarks, a commenter on The_Donald wrote, “FUCK THAT LOW ENERGY CUCK!”)
Shortly after the election, Brad Parscale, the Trump campaign’s top digital strategist, told Wired, “Facebook and Twitter were the reason we won this thing.” Reddit was also an important part of Trump’s strategy. Parscale wrote—on Reddit, naturally—that “members here provided considerable growth and reach to our campaign.” The_Donald, in particular, proved a fecund host cell for viral memes. On July 2, 2016, Trump tweeted a photo collage of Hillary Clinton, piles of cash, and the phrase “Most Corrupt Candidate Ever!” written inside a six-pointed star. When Trump’s critics called attention to the image’s anti-Semitic implications, The_Donald’s users rushed to Trump’s defense, posting photos of other six-pointed stars in innocuous contexts. “Where is the outrage from the liberal left on this one?” a user wrote, beneath a photo of a “Frozen”-themed sticker book with a star on its cover. A few hours later, Trump tweeted the same photo, with a version of the same question, followed by “Dishonest media! #Frozen.”
During the campaign, Trump, or someone typing on his behalf, participated in Reddit’s signature interview format—an A.M.A., for “ask me anything.” In response to a question about the “protected class of media elites,” Trump wrote, “I have been very concerned about media bias and the total dishonesty of the press. I think new media is a great way to get out the truth.” This drew hundreds of jubilant comments (u/RAINBOW_DILDO: “daddy YES”; u/CantContheDon: “WE’RE THE MEDIA NOW”).
The_Donald, with more than half a million subscribers, is by far the biggest pro-Trump subreddit, but it ranks just below No. 150 on the list of all subreddits; it’s roughly the same size as CryptoCurrency and ComicBooks. “Some people on The_Donald are expressing their genuine political beliefs, and obviously that’s something we want to encourage,” Huffman said. “Others are maybe not expressing sincere beliefs, but are treating it more like a game—If I post this ridiculous or offensive thing, can I get people to upvote it? And then some people, to quote ‘The Dark Knight,’ just want to watch the world burn.” On some smaller far-right subreddits, the discourse is more unhinged. One, created in July of 2016, was called Physical_Removal. According to its “About Us” section, it was a subreddit for people who believe that liberals “qualify to get a helicopter ride.” “Helicopter ride,” an allusion to Augusto Pinochet’s reputed habit of throwing Communists out of helicopters, is alt-right slang for murder.
The_Donald accounts for less than one per cent of Reddit’s traffic, but it occupies far more than one per cent of the Reddit-wide conversation. Trolls set a cunning trap. By ignoring their provocations, you risk seeming complicit. By responding, you amplify their message. Trump, perhaps the world’s most skilled troll, can get attention whenever he wants, simply by being outrageous. Traditional journalists and editors can decide to resist the bait, and sometimes they do, but that option isn’t available on user-generated platforms. Social-media executives claim to transcend subjectivity, and they have designed their platforms to be feedback machines, giving us not what we claim to want, nor what might be good for us, but what we actually pay attention to.
There are no good solutions to this problem, and so tech executives tend to discuss it as seldom as possible, and only in the airiest of platitudes. Twitter has rebuffed repeated calls to ban President Trump’s account, despite his many apparent violations of company policy. (If tweeting that North Korea “won’t be around much longer” doesn’t break Twitter’s rule against “specific threats of violence,” it’s not clear what would.) Last fall, on his Facebook page, Mark Zuckerberg addressed—sort of, obliquely—the widespread critique that his company was exacerbating political polarization. “We’ll keep working to ensure the integrity of free and fair elections around the world, and to ensure our community is a platform for all ideas and force for good in democracy,” he wrote, then stepped away as a global howl of frustration grew in the comments.
I asked a few social-media executives to talk to me about all this. I didn’t expect definitive answers, I told them; I just wanted to hear them think through the questions. Unsurprisingly, no one jumped at the chance. Twitter mostly ignored my e-mails. Snapchat’s P.R. representatives had breakfast with me once, then ignored my e-mails. Facebook’s representatives talked to me for weeks, asking precise, intelligent questions, before they started to ignore my e-mails.
Reddit has more reason to be transparent. It’s big, but doesn’t feel indispensable to most Internet users or, for that matter, to most advertisers. Moreover, Anderson Cooper’s CNN segment was hardly the only bit of vividly terrible press that Reddit has received over the years. All social networks contain vitriol and bigotry, but not all social networks are equally associated with these things in the public imagination. Recently, I typed “Reddit is” into Google. Three of the top suggested auto-completions were “toxic,” “cancer,” and “hot garbage.”
Huffman, after leaving Condé Nast, spent a few months backpacking in Costa Rica, then founded a travel company called Hipmunk. In July, 2015, he returned to Reddit as C.E.O. In a post about his “top priority” in the job, he wrote, “The overwhelming majority of content on reddit comes from wonderful, creative, funny, smart, and silly communities. There is also a dark side, communities whose purpose is reprehensible, and we don’t have any obligation to support them. . . . Neither Alexis nor I created reddit to be a bastion of free speech.” This was shocking, and about half true. When free-speech absolutism was in vogue, Reddit’s co-founders were as susceptible to its appeal as anyone. In 2012, a Forbes reporter asked Ohanian how the Founding Fathers might have reacted to Reddit. “A bastion of free speech on the World Wide Web? I bet they would like it,” Ohanian responded. “I would love to imagine that ‘Common Sense’ would have been a self-post on Reddit, by Thomas Paine, or actually a redditor named T_Paine.”
Still, Ohanian and Huffman never took their own rhetoric too literally. The site’s rules were brief and vague, and their unwritten policy was even simpler. “We always banned people,” Huffman told me. “We just didn’t talk about it very much.” Because Reddit was so small, and misbehavior relatively rare, Huffman could do most of the banning himself, on an ad-hoc basis. “It wasn’t well thought out or even articulated, really. It was ‘That guy has the N-word in his username? Fuck that.’ Delete account.”
As C.E.O., Huffman continued the trend Pao had started, banning a few viciously racist subreddits such as Coontown. “There was pushback,” Huffman told me. “But I had the moral authority, as the founder, to take it in stride.” If Pao was like a forbearing parent, then Huffman’s style was closer to “I brought you into this world, and I can take you out of it.” “Yes, I know that it’s really hard to define hate speech, and I know that any way we define it has the potential to set a dangerous precedent,” he told me. “I also know that a community called Coontown is not good for Reddit.” In most cases, Reddit didn’t suspend individual users’ accounts, Huffman said: “We just took away the spaces where they liked to hang out, and went, ‘Let’s see if this helps.’ ”
Reddit’s headquarters, in a former radio tower in downtown San Francisco, look like a stereotypical startup office: high concrete ceilings, a large common area with beer and kombucha on tap. Each desk is decorated aggressively with personal flair—a “Make Reddit Great Again” hat, a glossy print magazine called Meme Insider. Working at Reddit requires paying close anthropological attention to the motley tastes of redditors, and it’s not uncommon to see groups of fit, well-dressed employees cheerfully discussing the most recent post on CatDimension or PeopleFuckingDying.
The first morning I visited the office, I ran into Huffman, who was wearing jeans, a T-shirt, and Adidas indoor-soccer shoes, as he tried to persuade an employee to buy a ticket to Burning Man. Huffman is far more unfiltered than other social-media executives, and every time he and I talked in the presence of Reddit’s head of P.R., he said at least one thing that made her wince. “There’s only one Steve,” Ohanian told me. “No matter when you catch him, for better or worse, that’s the Steve you’re gonna get.” I had a list of delicate topics that I planned to ask Huffman about eventually, including allegations of vote manipulation on Reddit’s front page and his personal feelings about Trump. Huffman raised all of them himself on the first day. “My political views might not be exactly what you’d predict,” he said. “I’m a gun owner, for example. And I don’t care all that much about politics, compared to other things.” He speaks in quick bursts, with an alpha-nerd combination of introversion and confidence. His opinion about Trump is that he is incompetent and that his Presidency has mostly been a failure. But, he told me, “I’m open to counterarguments.”
That afternoon, I watched Huffman make a sales pitch to a group of executives from a New York advertising agency. Like many platforms, Reddit has struggled to convert its huge audience into a stable revenue stream, and its representatives spend a lot of time trying to convince potential advertisers that Reddit is not hot garbage. Huffman sat at the head of a long table, facing a dozen men and women in suits. The “snarky, libertarian” ethos of early Reddit, he said, “mostly came from me as a twenty-one-year-old. I’ve since grown out of that, to the relief of everyone.” The executives nodded and chuckled. “We had a lot of baggage,” he continued. “We let the story get away from us. And now we’re trying to get our shit together.”
Later, Huffman told me that getting Reddit’s shit together would require continual intervention. “I don’t think I’m going to leave the office one Friday and go, ‘Mission accomplished—we fixed the Internet,’ ” he said. “Every day, you keep visiting different parts of the site, opening this random door or that random door—‘What’s it like in here? Does this feel like a shitty place to be? No, people are generally having a good time, nobody’s hatching any evil plots, nobody’s crying. O.K., great.’ And you move on to the next room.”
In January, Facebook announced that it would make news less visible in its users’ feeds. “Facebook was originally designed to connect friends and family—and it has excelled at that,” a product manager named Samidh Chakrabarti wrote on a company blog. “But as unprecedented numbers of people channel their political energy through this medium, it’s being used in unforeseen ways with societal repercussions that were never anticipated.” It wasn’t the most effusive mea culpa in history, but by Facebook’s standards it amounted to wailing and gnashing of teeth. “We want to make sure that our products are not just fun, but are good for people,” Mark Zuckerberg told the Times. Direct pronouncements from him are so rare that even this pabulum was treated as push-alert-worthy news.
(Continued Part Two of Two - https://www.reddit.com/CapitalistParadise/comments/842ouv/reddit_and_the_struggle_to_detoxify_the_internet/?st=jepf79wf&sh=eaa395fc )
https://archive.is/Z9O4E
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The LIST: Metro Happenings Thursday March 01 - Sunday March 04, 2018

Thursday March 01, 2018

Friday, March 02 2018

Saturday, March 03, 2018

Sunday, March 04, 2018

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Mass Surveillance News Collection from 2010

>>>>>>>>> Mass Surveillance
>>>>>>>>> Cognitive Infiltration and Mass Social Psychology Abuse
>>>>>>>> Smartphone Intrusion, Remote activation of Mics and Cameras
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Ways and Means; Technology and Law
>>>>>>> AT&T
>>>>>>>>>> Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Yahoo
>>>>>>>> Goals
>>>>>>>>>>> Lies, Coverups, Resource Misuse, and Danger of Tacit Complicity
>>>>>> Global Deep State Cooperation and Imitation
>>>>>>>>> Hardware, Rootkit, FIrmware Spyware
>>>>>>>> Blowback
>>>>>> Exoteric, Stated Goals of the Security State Have Failed
....CONTINUED IN COMMENTS
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10 Youngest Bitcoin Millionaires with Crazy Lives - YouTube Teen bitcoin investor becomes millionaire From High School Dropout To Bitcoin Millionaire  CNBC ... Teen Millionaires  The kids running successful businesses ... Teen Bitcoin Millionaire turned $1000 into 1 Million Dollars

Teen Bitcoin Millionaire: “Bitcoin is Pretty Much Dead” by Robert Knight. One of the youngest cryptocurrency success stories has a rather bleak outlook for the leading digital asset, Bitcoin. Erik Finman became a millionaire in his teens by investing money that his grandmother had gifted him, starting as early as 2011. At the height of the Bitcoin bull market of 2017, Finman’s stack was ... Finman Hesitant on Ethereum . While Finman’s success with Bitcoin does not necessarily qualify him as an expert investor, he can rightfully claim to have been in the crypto game longer than ... Millionaire bitcoin teen claims: If you don't become rich in the next 10 years, then it’s your own fault Aged 12 Erik Finman bet his parents he would be a millionaire by 18 - if he lost, he had ... By CCN.com: Teenage bitcoin millionaire Erik Finman has once again thrown himself into the spotlight by claiming that the flagship cryptocurrency ‘will die’ unless the sticky issues it is facing are resolved.. Speaking to Yahoo Finance, Finman indicated that the sticky issues plaguing Bitcoin are four.This includes its complexity with regards to use, high transaction fees, slow processing ... Bitcoin Boy Erik Finman says if youre not a millionaire in ten years, its your own fault The small town kid from Idaho, US, started on the road to premature riches when he was 12 and his gran gave him 700 By Nick Whigham for News.com.au and Guy Birchall for The Sun Online A 19-YEAR-OLD Bitcoin mogul has said that if y

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10 Youngest Bitcoin Millionaires with Crazy Lives - YouTube

Erik Finman, bitcoin millionaire, discusses his strategy for buying bitcoin. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' ... Erik Finman Youngest Crypto Millionaire Lifestyle In this episode of Invest Diva, talk host Kiana Danial sits down with Erik Finman, one of the youngest Bitcoin Millionaire. Erik started his ... UPDATE: The easiest place to buy bitcoin for beginners is coinbase. https://www.coinbase.com/join/530389b521b18c926000003f sign up with my link and get $10 f... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Bitcoin millionaire Erik Finman on how he got started investing in bitcoin.

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